The language of wine contains a wealth of meanings that are not all too familiar, particularly the technical interpretations. The glossary describes and offers an explanation to the most common terms.

tasty wines
refers to highly aromatic wines

Such as Gelber Muskateller (Muscat), Muskat-Ottonel, Sauvignon Blanc, Traminer and so on.

TBA
the short description for Trockenbeerenauslese
TCA
trichloroanisole

A wine fault that displays an undesirable mouldy, musty smell and taste. The cause is the presence of trichloroanisole (TCA), and we differentiate between the classic (unmistakable) cork taint, and a subtle taste of cork, and the latter often suppresses the fruit of the wine and can be difficult to detect.

tears
church windows

The colloquial term for church windows, or the legs of a wine with high extract, that develop on the inside surface of the wine glass.

teinturier wine
colour intensifier

A red wine variety that is blended with other red wines just for its colour benefit, in Austria a common example would be the Blauburger.

temperature

Temperature plays a central role in the vinification (temperature of the fermentation), in the storage of wine (wine cellar temperature) and particularly in the restaurants. The pleasure of enjoying a wine is defined by the serving temperature and correct drinking temperature of the wine.

temperature control
used to control the fermentation
terraces

If the slope incline is too steep for standard vine cultivation, then terraces are built, known as terrace viticulture. Small parcels were traditionally constructed with dry-stone alling and stone steps, and this is still a common feature in the Wachau.

terroir
the combination of several factors, above all the soil structure, vineyard site and microclimate, as well as origin, vineyard management, vinification and so on



Tertiärbukett
Positive and pleasant aromatic impression that originally derive from the grapes

"The various aroma components, ranging from floral, fruity, spicy and so on, are listed in the aroma wheel. Both the bouquet in the nose and the retronasal aroma perception at the back of the throat, often described in English as the flavour.
We sub-divide the aromas into three categories, the primary, secondary and tertiary aromas or bouquet. Primary aromas refer to the fruit flavour components found in the grape, and which upon tasting, are recognisable with aromas present in the finished wine. We speak of wine-like or grapey aromas, and often you can recognise the character of the grape variety from a particular scent of berries, fruit, petals or flower, for example the intense rose petal aroma in Traminer. The secondary aromas come from the winery, and are aromatic components that derive from grape handling, fermentation and the maturation of the wine. You can even refer to the smell of fermentation, or detect wine faults (such as too much sulphur dioxide) yet the more desirable aromas include roasting or toasting and vanilla from oak barrel aging. The tertiary aromas are those that develop with bottle aging, a typical example being the development of the petrol note with maturing Riesling. Again, wine faults may also be included, the most common being cork taint."

tertiary aromas
Positive and pleasant aromatic impression that originally derive from the grapes

"The various aroma components, ranging from floral, fruity, spicy and so on, are listed in the aroma wheel. Both the bouquet in the nose and the retronasal aroma perception at the back of the throat, often described in English as the flavour.
We sub-divide the aromas into three categories, the primary, secondary and tertiary aromas or bouquet. Primary aromas refer to the fruit flavour components found in the grape, and which upon tasting, are recognisable with aromas present in the finished wine. We speak of wine-like or grapey aromas, and often you can recognise the character of the grape variety from a particular scent of berries, fruit, petals or flower, for example the intense rose petal aroma in Traminer. The secondary aromas come from the winery, and are aromatic components that derive from grape handling, fermentation and the maturation of the wine. You can even refer to the smell of fermentation, or detect wine faults (such as too much sulphur dioxide) yet the more desirable aromas include roasting or toasting and vanilla from oak barrel aging. The tertiary aromas are those that develop with bottle aging, a typical example being the development of the petrol note with maturing Riesling. Again, wine faults may also be included, the most common being cork taint."

texture
a sensory term for a wine that describes a tactile impression on the palate

Surface character.

the flowering of the vine
flowering

The flowering of the vine prior to the development of the grapes.

The French Paradox
examination regarding the positive health benefits of drinking red wine

The French Paradox was a massive medical experiment in the 1990s, that concluded that regular and moderate consumption of red wine, particularly in the south of France, drastically reduces the death rate of cardiovascular disease.

Thermenregion
winegrowing region

Here, 2.181 hectares of vineyards lie at the edge of the Vienna Woods. In the northern section, fruit driven, yet full-bodied white wine dominates with the indigenous varietiesZierfandler and Rotgipfler. Read more

 

Thermenwinzer
the name of a vintner association

Leading producers in the Thermenregion represent their local and indigenous varietal specialities in an exemplary manner.

thin
light

A light-bodied wine that lacks extract and alcohol.

tipsy

A colloquial, jovial word for becoming "merry".

tired

A tasting description, the wine is past its best and is showing age, has lost its freshness and the acidity has decreased.

to add sulphur

Sulphur is used in the most modern types of vinification and is usually found in liquid form and added to the wine from a pressurised bottles. Sulphur can also be used in winemaking from its solid form (e.g. sulphur sticks) or as a gas or powder. If sulphur is not added to a wine, or if the wine is not sulphurized, then it would rapidly oxidise and become unpleasant to drink very quickly. Red wines generally require less sulphur compared with white or sweet wines, because their natural preservative is found in the tannins.

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