Tips from the experts

Stephan Vadnjal - Dolce Vita|Klagenfurt

Austrian wine is always a safe choice when it comes to food and wine pairing, and Italian cuisine is no exception. Fresh Styrian wines make the perfect pairing partner during the summer months, although Sauvignon Blanc should not be too intense, green or loud. A Grüner Veltliner is a delightful match for fish served in a reduction sauce while spicy fish dishes go excellently with Frühroter Veltliner (Malvasier).

Georg Rahofer - Rahofer|Steyr

Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris are ideal companions for fish and seafood with fresh and ripe Styrian versions seeming to be predestined for this. I tend to recommend lighter versions to go with antipasti. If red wine is preferred, intensive blends are a good match for Mediterranean dishes as well as Merlot from Austria, provided the wine is not too fruity.

Lefteris Dermitzakis - Ellas & Orpheus|Vienna

Light, fruity and easy drinking wines are always top of my list of recommendations for classic Greek cuisine. Grüner Veltliner can be served instead of a Retsina and milder Veltliner wines go well with seasoned fish or lamb because they are great thirst quenchers. Riesling on the other hand is a difficult grape variety whereas Blaufränkisch is ideal, especially with moussaka.

Michael Kahovec - Fabios|Vienna

Sardinian octopus and potato salad harmonises with dry, crisp and slightly spicy Grüner Veltliner. Generally speaking, light and fresh white wines such as Sauvignon from Styria pair brilliantly with antipasti from any region. I recommend Morillon with slightly woody notes with salami and prosciutto. Red wines should not be too concentrated. Dry Blaufränkisch with fruit and depth is the ideal choice for bistecca, pheasant or wild boar.

Cornelia Poletto - Poletto|Hamburg

My cooking style is very versatile - just like Austrian wines, which have gained finesse in recent years. While cooking, I like to adapt the food to fit the wine it will be paired with. For example, I make my carbonara with Tyrolean bacon instead of pancetta if it is going to be served with an Austrian wine.

Sigrid Brantl - Wine Merchant|Munich

Sauvignon Blanc is an excellent match for Mediterranean cuisine. Depending on personal preference, it could be a classic version or even one of higher quality. Styrian Pinot Gris or Morillon harmonise well too, but Grüner Veltliner is unbeatable on every level: it never fails to impress. Zweigelt and Pinot Noir are equally as recommendable, as are blends with Zweigelt and Blaufränkisch.